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image: One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

By | August 26, 2016

Precursor T cells bearing the same antigen receptor adopt two different fates in mice.

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image: Birds Warn Unborn Chicks About Warmer Weather

Birds Warn Unborn Chicks About Warmer Weather

By | August 22, 2016

Zebra finches sing a special song that appears to help their offspring better adapt to a hotter climate, according to a study.

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Science advocacy organizations have drafted a list of 20 questions for Hillary Clinton, Gary Johnson, Jill Stein, and Donald Trump; will post responses as they roll in.

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image: <em>Vibrio</em> Infections On the Rise

Vibrio Infections On the Rise

By | August 9, 2016

Increases in oceanic populations of these bacteria—both pathogenic and not—is an effect of climate change, scientists show.

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image: Study: Last Woolly Mammoths Died of Thirst

Study: Last Woolly Mammoths Died of Thirst

By | August 3, 2016

On remote island near Alaska, salt water intrusion and a warming climate killed off the last remaining survivors of the species.

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image: How Your Nose Got Its Shape

How Your Nose Got Its Shape

By | August 1, 2016

Climate variation has sculpted our schnozzes since the earliest humans evolved, but environmental pressures can’t explain everything.

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image: Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

By | August 1, 2016

In mice, immune cells from the body cavity surrounding organs arrive at the site of damage to chew up the nuclei of dead cells.

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image: Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

By | August 1, 2016

Immune cells called macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of mice migrate to injured livers and aid in repair.

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image: Ocean Acidification Affects Fish Spawning

Ocean Acidification Affects Fish Spawning

By | July 26, 2016

Researchers report the first evidence that acidified waters alter the ocellated wrasse’s reproductive behavior in the wild.

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image: Oysters At Risk

Oysters At Risk

By | July 1, 2016

Climate change is causing ocean acidification, and shellfish, such as oysters, are bearing the brunt of the shift.

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