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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.


image: Can’t Take the Heat

Can’t Take the Heat

By | October 10, 2014

Warming waters will cause many fish species to move from the tropics toward the poles, a study predicts.


image: Tiny Animals May Drive Motion in the Ocean

Tiny Animals May Drive Motion in the Ocean

By | October 2, 2014

The collective swimming of brine shrimp markedly impacts water currents, a study shows.


image: Obama Protects Huge Swath of Pacific Ocean

Obama Protects Huge Swath of Pacific Ocean

By | September 26, 2014

The president exercises his authority to expand an existing marine reserve, making it the largest in the world.

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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.


image: Incorporating Soil Microbes in Climate Change Models

Incorporating Soil Microbes in Climate Change Models

By | September 23, 2014

Without a solid understanding of how the soil microbiome contributes to atmospheric carbon, researchers are struggling to determine whether dirt-dwelling bacteria could impact—and be impacted by—climate change.


image: Bye Bye, Birdies?

Bye Bye, Birdies?

By | September 9, 2014

A report from the National Audubon Society suggests that more than half of US bird species are under threat of displacement or extinction in the face of climate change.


image: Seeds of Hopelessness

Seeds of Hopelessness

By | August 1, 2014

Can seed banks adequately prepare for the future if wild plant populations are already lagging behind in adapting to rapid climate change?


image: Hitting a Climate “Seal”-ing

Hitting a Climate “Seal”-ing

By | July 23, 2014

Due to the effects of climate change, female fur seals that successfully breed do so later in life and are more likely to have increased variability within their genomes.


image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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