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image: Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers design antibody-like proteins to awaken and destroy HIV holdouts.

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image: Ocean Sentinels

Ocean Sentinels

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers are struggling to understand shifts in the migratory patterns of penguins in the Southwest Atlantic.

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image: Bumblebee Tongues Growing Shorter

Bumblebee Tongues Growing Shorter

By | September 28, 2015

Two alpine bee species have evolved shorter tongues, adapting to floral declines related to climate change.

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image: Dengue’s Downfall?

Dengue’s Downfall?

By | September 15, 2015

Researchers characterize a protein that could be key to the virus’s virulence—and to developing a vaccine against the mosquito-borne disease.

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image: Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

By | September 8, 2015

Much of the CD4+ T-cell death that occurs during HIV infection may be caused by direct delivery of the virus from neighboring cells, a study shows.

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image: Body, Heal Thyself

Body, Heal Thyself

By | September 1, 2015

Reviving a decades-old hypothesis of autoimmunity

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Speaking of Science

By | August 13, 2015

Clash over Climate Change

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image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | August 1, 2015

August 2015's selection of notable quotes

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