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image: How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

By | March 1, 2017

One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia

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image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: Image of the Day: Penguin Run

Image of the Day: Penguin Run

By | March 1, 2017

Little penguins (Eudyptula minor) live on the southeast coast of Australia, one of the global “hot spots” of marine diversity most severely affected by global warming.

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An analysis of 130 studies reveals that the threat of global warming to wildlife has been underreported. 

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The Princeton physicist told The Scientist that then-President–elect Donald Trump last month agreed with his position that climate change research has become a “cult movement.” Happer also shared his thoughts on federal research funding, demonstrators marching for science, and more.

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Researchers solve the mystery of 15-year-old mutant ferns with disrupted sex determination.

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

5 Comments

image: Scientists Respond to CDC Climate Summit Cancellation

Scientists Respond to CDC Climate Summit Cancellation

By | January 25, 2017

An agency-sponsored meeting, which is now postponed indefinitely, was intended to highlight the ways in which global warming poses threats to public health.

1 Comment

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