The Scientist

» climate change and culture

Most Recent

By ditching traditional agar-based media, two biochemists captured iconic images of Myxococcus in 1982.

0 Comments

image: How Your Nose Got Its Shape

How Your Nose Got Its Shape

By | August 1, 2016

Climate variation has sculpted our schnozzes since the earliest humans evolved, but environmental pressures can’t explain everything.

5 Comments

image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | August 1, 2016

Brexit's effect on science, melding disciplines, and more

0 Comments

image: Ocean Acidification Affects Fish Spawning

Ocean Acidification Affects Fish Spawning

By | July 26, 2016

Researchers report the first evidence that acidified waters alter the ocellated wrasse’s reproductive behavior in the wild.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Blood Sugar</em>

Book Excerpt from Blood Sugar

By | July 1, 2016

Author Anthony Ryan Hatch relays his personal experience with metabolic syndrome.

1 Comment

image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

0 Comments

image: Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

By | July 1, 2016

Scientists who study the lifestyle disorder must do a better job of incorporating political and social science into their work.

1 Comment

image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | July 1, 2016

Human Genome Project-Write; viruses are alpha predators; Zika and the Olympics

1 Comment

image: Oysters At Risk

Oysters At Risk

By | July 1, 2016

Climate change is causing ocean acidification, and shellfish, such as oysters, are bearing the brunt of the shift.

0 Comments

image: Tessa Hill Wants to Save the Bivalves

Tessa Hill Wants to Save the Bivalves

By | July 1, 2016

The UC Davis oceanographer reconstructs ancient climate and studies the present impacts of global warming in an attempt to stave off environmental damage.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

  3. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  4. Government Nixes Teaching Evolution in Turkish Schools
AAAS