The Scientist

» climate change and developmental biology

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image: Oysters At Risk

Oysters At Risk

By | July 1, 2016

Climate change is causing ocean acidification, and shellfish, such as oysters, are bearing the brunt of the shift.

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image: Tessa Hill Wants to Save the Bivalves

Tessa Hill Wants to Save the Bivalves

By | July 1, 2016

The UC Davis oceanographer reconstructs ancient climate and studies the present impacts of global warming in an attempt to stave off environmental damage.

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image: The Earth's Changing Seas

The Earth's Changing Seas

By | July 1, 2016

Marine pathogens flourish in oceans that are warmer and more acidic.

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image: Changing Oceans Breed Disease

Changing Oceans Breed Disease

By | July 1, 2016

In the planet’s warming and acidifying oceans, species from corals to lobsters and fish are succumbing to pathogenic infection.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | June 1, 2016

Beyond Biocentrism, The Sting of the Wild, The Birth of Anthropocene, and Ordinarily Well

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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks. 

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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