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image: War-born Climate Change

War-born Climate Change

By | July 3, 2012

A nuclear war could have profound effects on crops yields around the world, according to a new study.

2 Comments

image: Climate Change Threatens Climate Lab

Climate Change Threatens Climate Lab

By | June 28, 2012

Wildfires in Colorado, sparked by record temperatures, force the National Center for Atmospheric Research to close its doors for 2 days running.

7 Comments

image: EPA to Regulate Greenhouse Emissions

EPA to Regulate Greenhouse Emissions

By | June 28, 2012

A federal appeals court upholds the Environmental Protection Agency’s right to regulate air pollution under the Clean Air Act.

1 Comment

image: West Coast Marine Threat

West Coast Marine Threat

By | June 18, 2012

Rising ocean acidity along the California coast may wreak havoc in the region’s oyster populations.

0 Comments

image: A Greener Arctic

A Greener Arctic

By | June 11, 2012

Algal blooms are appearing under the ice in the Arctic Ocean in areas thought to receive too little light to support photosynthetic life.

0 Comments

image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

0 Comments

image: Climate Change Threatens Mammals

Climate Change Threatens Mammals

By | May 16, 2012

Almost 10 percent of mammals in the Western Hemisphere won’t be able to shift their territories in time to avoid the consequences of climate change.

9 Comments

image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

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