The Scientist

» climate change and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: A Deathly Pallor

A Deathly Pallor

By | March 1, 2015

Global warming could lead to lighter-colored insects with waning immune defenses.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2015

March 2015's selection of notable quotes

3 Comments

image: Climate Change Denier on Fossil Fuel Payroll

Climate Change Denier on Fossil Fuel Payroll

By | February 23, 2015

A leading scientific voice among global warming skeptics received funding from the energy industry while publishing claims that climate change is not driven by human activity.

1 Comment

image: Going with the Flow

Going with the Flow

By | January 7, 2015

An analysis of polar bear genes corroborates the mammals’ recent migration to icier climes.

0 Comments

image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

image: Ocean Acidification Harming Shellfish

Ocean Acidification Harming Shellfish

By | December 17, 2014

Researchers determine why larval oysters and mussels are sensitive to reduced pH.

0 Comments

image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

0 Comments

image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

0 Comments

image: Can’t Take the Heat

Can’t Take the Heat

By | October 10, 2014

Warming waters will cause many fish species to move from the tropics toward the poles, a study predicts.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  3. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
  4. Identifying Predatory Publishers
AAAS