The Scientist

» climate change and developmental biology

Most Recent

Science advocacy organizations have drafted a list of 20 questions for Hillary Clinton, Gary Johnson, Jill Stein, and Donald Trump; will post responses as they roll in.

0 Comments

image: <em>Vibrio</em> Infections On the Rise

Vibrio Infections On the Rise

By | August 9, 2016

Increases in oceanic populations of these bacteria—both pathogenic and not—is an effect of climate change, scientists show.

0 Comments

image: Study: Last Woolly Mammoths Died of Thirst

Study: Last Woolly Mammoths Died of Thirst

By | August 3, 2016

On remote island near Alaska, salt water intrusion and a warming climate killed off the last remaining survivors of the species.

0 Comments

image: How Your Nose Got Its Shape

How Your Nose Got Its Shape

By | August 1, 2016

Climate variation has sculpted our schnozzes since the earliest humans evolved, but environmental pressures can’t explain everything.

5 Comments

image: Ocean Acidification Affects Fish Spawning

Ocean Acidification Affects Fish Spawning

By | July 26, 2016

Researchers report the first evidence that acidified waters alter the ocellated wrasse’s reproductive behavior in the wild.

0 Comments

image: Oysters At Risk

Oysters At Risk

By | July 1, 2016

Climate change is causing ocean acidification, and shellfish, such as oysters, are bearing the brunt of the shift.

0 Comments

image: Tessa Hill Wants to Save the Bivalves

Tessa Hill Wants to Save the Bivalves

By | July 1, 2016

The UC Davis oceanographer reconstructs ancient climate and studies the present impacts of global warming in an attempt to stave off environmental damage.

1 Comment

image: The Earth's Changing Seas

The Earth's Changing Seas

By | July 1, 2016

Marine pathogens flourish in oceans that are warmer and more acidic.

0 Comments

image: Changing Oceans Breed Disease

Changing Oceans Breed Disease

By | July 1, 2016

In the planet’s warming and acidifying oceans, species from corals to lobsters and fish are succumbing to pathogenic infection.

0 Comments

image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Unstructured Proteins Help Tardigrades Survive Desiccation
  2. What Budget Cuts Might Mean for US Science
    News Analysis What Budget Cuts Might Mean for US Science

    A look at the historical effects of downsized research funding suggests that the Trump administration’s proposed budget could hit early-career scientists the hardest.  

  3. Inflammation Drives Gut Bacteria Evolution
  4. Opinion: On “The Impact Factor Fallacy”
Business Birmingham