The Scientist

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Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2016

May 2016's selection of notable quotes

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A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2016

Lab Girl, The Most Perfect Thing, Half-Earth, and Cosmosapiens

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Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

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Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2016

January 2016's selection of notable quotes

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Speaking of Science 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A year’s worth of noteworthy quotes

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