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» climate change and developmental biology

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: Week in Review: March 25-29

Week in Review: March 25-29

By | March 29, 2013

Microbes affect weight loss; dozens of cancer-linked genes identified; a climate change scientists speaks out about personal attacks; isolation among elderly linked to death

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image: Opinion: Life as a Target

Opinion: Life as a Target

By | March 27, 2013

Attacks on my work aimed at undermining climate change science have turned me into a public figure. I have come to embrace that role.

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image: Ants Climb as Weather Warms

Ants Climb as Weather Warms

By | March 26, 2013

Rising temperatures allow one mountain ant to climb higher, displacing a related species and possibly upsetting plant ecology.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2013

March 2013's selection of notable quotes

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Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: Seals Reveal Ocean Secrets

Seals Reveal Ocean Secrets

By | February 26, 2013

Oceanographers deployed elephant seals to discover a new source of Antarctic bottom water, cold deep-ocean currents that play a key role in global ocean circulation.  

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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