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image: Drug Approvals Up

Drug Approvals Up

By | December 7, 2012

The total number of new drugs approved this year ties last year for the highest since 2004, suggesting that the pharmaceutical industry is recovering.  


image: NYU Still Recovering from Sandy

NYU Still Recovering from Sandy

By | December 7, 2012

NYU’s Langone Medical Center continues to struggle from the lasting impact of the 15-foot storm surge that accompanied the recent hurricane.


image: Arctic’s Menacing Melt

Arctic’s Menacing Melt

By | December 7, 2012

A new assessment reveals that the Arctic’s environment is rapidly deteriorating, threatening species and global weather patterns.

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image: Hurry Up, FDA

Hurry Up, FDA

By | December 6, 2012

The US Food and Drug Administration is taking steps to get new devices on the market sooner—and antibiotics may be next.


image: MicroRNAs Repair Heart Cells

MicroRNAs Repair Heart Cells

By | December 5, 2012

Researchers identify microRNAs that keep cardiac cells healthy after heart attack, potentially paving the way for future heart regenerating therapies.

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image: New Mental Health Manual

New Mental Health Manual

By | December 5, 2012

Amid controversy, the American Psychiatric Association has approved the fifth edition of its guidebook on mental disorders.

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image: Opinion: Evolving CO2-Hungry Crops

Opinion: Evolving CO2-Hungry Crops

By and | December 4, 2012

Breeding plants that can convert more carbon dioxide to food could help feed a growing population.

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image: Special Review for H5N1 Grants?

Special Review for H5N1 Grants?

By | December 4, 2012

The National Institutes of Health reveals a controversial plan to regulate the funding of H5N1 research.


image: Stem Cells from Blood

Stem Cells from Blood

By | December 3, 2012

Researchers develop a practical technique for deriving stem cells from routine blood samples.  


image: An Epi Phenomenon

An Epi Phenomenon

By | December 1, 2012

While exploring the genetics of a rare type of tumor, Stephen Baylin discovered an epigenetic modification that occurs in most every cancer—a finding he’s helping bring to the clinic.


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