The Scientist

» climate change, evolution and neuroscience

Most Recent

Once again, climate change is killing off masses of coral in Australia’s expansive reef system.

0 Comments

image: Sharks May Have Evolved from Acanthodians

Sharks May Have Evolved from Acanthodians

By | March 14, 2017

Analysis of an ancient shark fossil provides the strongest evidence to date that modern sharks derive from a class of 400 million–year-old bony fish.

0 Comments

“Buena vista” hypothesis suggests that changes in the sizes of eyes, rather than a shift from fins to limbs, led fish to transition to land more than 300 million years ago.  

1 Comment

image: Terabytes of Government Data Copied

Terabytes of Government Data Copied

By | March 8, 2017

The latest stats on volunteers’ efforts in recent months to preserve environmental information generated by federal science agencies

3 Comments

image: Cortical Interneurons Show Layer-Specific Activities

Cortical Interneurons Show Layer-Specific Activities

By | March 2, 2017

Researchers examine the firing patterns of interneurons throughout all layers of the somatosensory cortices of alert mice.  

0 Comments

 Zebra finches reared by another species learn to sing their foster parents’ song with rhythms characteristic of their genetic background.

0 Comments

image: John Iversen Explores our Perception of Musical Rhythm

John Iversen Explores our Perception of Musical Rhythm

By | March 1, 2017

At the Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience at the University of California, San Diego, the researcher studies the neurobiology of music perception.

1 Comment

Zebra finches dial down dopamine signaling when they hear errors in a song performance.

0 Comments

image: Singing In the Brain

Singing In the Brain

By | March 1, 2017

His first love was dance, but Erich Jarvis has long courted another love—understanding how the brain learns vocalization.

0 Comments

image: Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

By | March 1, 2017

Researchers are using multiple methods to study the origins of humans’ capacity to process and produce music, and there’s no shortage of debate about the results.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Antarctica Is Turning Green
  2. How to Tell a Person’s “Brain Age”
  3. Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself
  4. Life Science Funding Cuts Leaked
    The Nutshell Life Science Funding Cuts Leaked

    According to a document posted online less than a day before the release of the official 2018 budget proposal, the National Institutes of Health could face even deeper cuts than previously suggested by the Trump administration.

AAAS