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image: Another Dinosaur with Short Arms Discovered

Another Dinosaur with Short Arms Discovered

By | July 14, 2016

Gualicho shinyae evolved small limbs independently of T. rex, researchers report.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Blood Sugar</em>

Book Excerpt from Blood Sugar

By | July 1, 2016

Author Anthony Ryan Hatch relays his personal experience with metabolic syndrome.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

By | July 1, 2016

Scientists who study the lifestyle disorder must do a better job of incorporating political and social science into their work.

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image: Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

By | July 1, 2016

An experimental evolution study shows that more cheaters arise when bread mold fungal cells are less related to one another.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | July 1, 2016

Human Genome Project-Write; viruses are alpha predators; Zika and the Olympics

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image: Oysters At Risk

Oysters At Risk

By | July 1, 2016

Climate change is causing ocean acidification, and shellfish, such as oysters, are bearing the brunt of the shift.

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image: Tessa Hill Wants to Save the Bivalves

Tessa Hill Wants to Save the Bivalves

By | July 1, 2016

The UC Davis oceanographer reconstructs ancient climate and studies the present impacts of global warming in an attempt to stave off environmental damage.

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image: The Earth's Changing Seas

The Earth's Changing Seas

By | July 1, 2016

Marine pathogens flourish in oceans that are warmer and more acidic.

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image: Changing Oceans Breed Disease

Changing Oceans Breed Disease

By | July 1, 2016

In the planet’s warming and acidifying oceans, species from corals to lobsters and fish are succumbing to pathogenic infection.

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