The Scientist

» climate change, evolution and ecology

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

By | June 1, 2017

Parallel evolution in jaws and teeth helped early mammals diversify their diets.

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image: No Place to Hide

No Place to Hide

By | May 31, 2017

Environmental DNA is tracking down difficult-to-detect species, from rock snot in the U.S. to cave salamanders in Croatia.

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image: Warming to Blame for Coral Bleaching in Hawaii

Warming to Blame for Coral Bleaching in Hawaii

By | May 30, 2017

Nearly half of the corals in a nature preserve off Oahu bleached in recent years, according to a study.

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image: Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

By | May 26, 2017

Two previously overlooked archaeal strains fill an evolutionary gap for microbes.

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image: Grad Student Acquitted in Thesis-Sharing Case

Grad Student Acquitted in Thesis-Sharing Case

By | May 25, 2017

Diego Gomez was facing jail time in Colombia for posting someone else’s copyrighted thesis online.

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image: Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

By | May 24, 2017

A fish created by spontaneous androgenesis is the first known vertebrate to arise naturally by this asexual reproductive phenomenon. 

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image: Antarctica Is Turning Green

Antarctica Is Turning Green

By | May 22, 2017

As the climate warms, moss growth dramatically spreads on the continent’s peninsula. 

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Harvesting lab-raised zebrafish based on their size led to differences in the activity of more than 4,000 genes, as well as changes in allele frequencies of those genes, in the fish that remained.

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image: A Coral to Outlast Climate Change

A Coral to Outlast Climate Change

By | May 18, 2017

Stylophora pistillata, a reef coral in the Northern Red Sea, thrived in simulated global-warming conditions.

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