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image: Global Alliance Teams Up with Google

Global Alliance Teams Up with Google

By | March 10, 2014

The international Global Alliance for Genomics and Health will be using a programming interface developed by the Internet giant to help its stakeholders analyze genomic data.

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image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Venter's New Venture

Venter's New Venture

By | March 5, 2014

The genomics pioneer is starting a new company that aims to tackle the mysteries of human aging.

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A butterfly’s varied disguises are controlled by variants of a single gene, partially confirming—and refuting—a decades-old hypothesis.

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image: More Mutations in Girls with Autism

More Mutations in Girls with Autism

By | March 4, 2014

A greater number of genetic mutations among autistic girls, compared to their male counterparts, suggests that the female brain can better handle such variations.  

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image: Ancient Giant Virus Discovered

Ancient Giant Virus Discovered

By | March 4, 2014

A new species of giant virus discovered in the Siberian permafrost, where it’s been buried for 30,000 years, is reincarnated in the lab.

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image: Goat Pheromone Double Whammy

Goat Pheromone Double Whammy

By | March 3, 2014

A single molecule emitted by male goats may influence female goat physiology and behavior.

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image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.

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image: Exosome Tentacles

Exosome Tentacles

By | March 1, 2014

Unlike the usual smooth, spherical shape of exosomes, glioblastoma-derived exosomes appear to have long nanofilaments protruding from their surfaces.

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image: Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure

By | March 1, 2014

Researchers are using snowdrifts to artificially warm Arctic tundra during winter and finding that more carbon is released from the soil than plants can soak up from the atmosphere.

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