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image: Oysters At Risk

Oysters At Risk

By | July 1, 2016

Climate change is causing ocean acidification, and shellfish, such as oysters, are bearing the brunt of the shift.

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image: Tessa Hill Wants to Save the Bivalves

Tessa Hill Wants to Save the Bivalves

By | July 1, 2016

The UC Davis oceanographer reconstructs ancient climate and studies the present impacts of global warming in an attempt to stave off environmental damage.

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image: The Earth's Changing Seas

The Earth's Changing Seas

By | July 1, 2016

Marine pathogens flourish in oceans that are warmer and more acidic.

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image: Changing Oceans Breed Disease

Changing Oceans Breed Disease

By | July 1, 2016

In the planet’s warming and acidifying oceans, species from corals to lobsters and fish are succumbing to pathogenic infection.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | June 1, 2016

Beyond Biocentrism, The Sting of the Wild, The Birth of Anthropocene, and Ordinarily Well

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Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2016

May 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2016

Lab Girl, The Most Perfect Thing, Half-Earth, and Cosmosapiens

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: All Together Now

All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

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