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image: Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity

Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity

By | November 16, 2015

In mice lacking intestinal microbiota, white fat turns brown and obesity is prevented.

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image: Blood-Gut Barrier

Blood-Gut Barrier

By | November 12, 2015

Scientists identify a barrier in mice between the intestine and its blood supply, and suggest how Salmonella sneaks through it.

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image: Exploring the Inner Universe

Exploring the Inner Universe

By | November 6, 2015

A new American Museum of Natural History exhibit introduces visitors to the microbes within their bodies. 

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image: Allele Linked to Obesity in People

Allele Linked to Obesity in People

By | November 3, 2015

A single nucleotide polymorphism in BDNF is tied with lower levels of the protein and higher body-mass index.

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image: Breast Milk and Obesity

Breast Milk and Obesity

By | November 2, 2015

A study links components of a mother’s milk to her infant’s growth.

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image: A Weighty Anomaly

A Weighty Anomaly

By | November 1, 2015

Why do some obese people actually experience health benefits?

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image: Appetite, Obesity, and the Brain

Appetite, Obesity, and the Brain

By | November 1, 2015

How the foods that make us fattest are not that different from heroin and cocaine

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image: Battling the Bulge

Battling the Bulge

By | November 1, 2015

Weight-loss drugs that target newly characterized obesity-related receptors and pathways could finally offer truly effective fat control.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2015

The Psychology of Overeating, The Hidden Half of Nature, The Death of Cancer, and The Secret of Our Success

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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