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image: Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet

Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet

By | November 23, 2015

Researchers should pay closer attention to the diets they use to study obesity in mice, experts advise.

6 Comments

image: Prominent Endocrinologist Dies

Prominent Endocrinologist Dies

By | November 20, 2015

Guenther Boden, who linked insulin resistance with fatty acids in the blood, has passed away at age 80.

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image: How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings

How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings

By | November 19, 2015

A type of bariatric surgery eliminates gut-to-brain signals that trigger sugar highs, a mouse study shows.  

1 Comment

image: Brain Fold Tied to Hallucinations

Brain Fold Tied to Hallucinations

By | November 19, 2015

A shorter crease in the medial prefrontal cortex is linked with a higher risk of schizophrenics experiencing hallucinations.

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image: Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity

Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity

By | November 16, 2015

In mice lacking intestinal microbiota, white fat turns brown and obesity is prevented.

2 Comments

image: Allele Linked to Obesity in People

Allele Linked to Obesity in People

By | November 3, 2015

A single nucleotide polymorphism in BDNF is tied with lower levels of the protein and higher body-mass index.

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image: Breast Milk and Obesity

Breast Milk and Obesity

By | November 2, 2015

A study links components of a mother’s milk to her infant’s growth.

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image: A Weighty Anomaly

A Weighty Anomaly

By | November 1, 2015

Why do some obese people actually experience health benefits?

3 Comments

image: Appetite, Obesity, and the Brain

Appetite, Obesity, and the Brain

By | November 1, 2015

How the foods that make us fattest are not that different from heroin and cocaine

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image: Battling the Bulge

Battling the Bulge

By | November 1, 2015

Weight-loss drugs that target newly characterized obesity-related receptors and pathways could finally offer truly effective fat control.

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