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» obesity and cell & molecular biology

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image: Obesity Alters Sperm Epigenome

Obesity Alters Sperm Epigenome

By | December 3, 2015

Moderately obese men display different epigenetic marks on their sperm than lean men, and bariatric surgery in massively obese men correlated with changes in sperm methylation.

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image: Another Obesity Drug Trial Death

Another Obesity Drug Trial Death

By | December 2, 2015

A second patient taking an experimental medication to treat Prader-Willi Syndrome has died of blood clots.


image: Carry-On Luggage

Carry-On Luggage

By | December 1, 2015

Without a vacuole, cell-cycle progression stalls out in yeast cells.


image: Getting Back in Shape

Getting Back in Shape

By | December 1, 2015

Contrary to years of research suggesting otherwise, most aggregated proteins regain their shape and functionality following heat shock.


image: Gia Voeltz: Cellular Cartographer

Gia Voeltz: Cellular Cartographer

By | December 1, 2015

Associate Professor, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder. Age: 43


image: Modern Rehab

Modern Rehab

By | December 1, 2015

See the soldier whose recovery from a debilitating muscle injury was greatly aided by a cellular therapy plus physical therapy.


image: Cellular Rehab

Cellular Rehab

By | December 1, 2015

Physical therapy and exercise are critical to the success of cell therapies approaching the clinic.


image: BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

By | November 30, 2015

The cancer-related protein BRCA1 is important for learning and memory in mice and is depleted in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, according to a study.


image: Cortical Census

Cortical Census

By | November 26, 2015

Scientists document the characteristics and connections of mouse neocortical neurons to establish the most detailed microcircuit map to date.

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image: Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

By | November 24, 2015

Bacteria in the intestine produce proteins that stop rodents from eating.


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