The Scientist

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Fat Labs

By | May 4, 2016

The tendency of Labrador retrievers to overeat is tied to their genes, researchers report.

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Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2016

Sorting the Beef from the Bull, Cheats and Deceits, A Sea of Glass, and Following the Wild Bees

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Monkey See, Monkey Die

By | May 1, 2016

What's killing howler monkeys in the jungles of Central America?

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Silent Canopies

By | May 1, 2016

A spate of howler monkey deaths in Nicaragua, Panama, and Ecuador has researchers scrambling to identify the cause.

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image: Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

By | April 28, 2016

Baby fish show fewer signs of stress in the presence of large fish that scare off midsize predators. 

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“Hunger Hormone” No More?

By | April 20, 2016

Ghrelin promotes fat storage not feeding, according to a study.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

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Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

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image: Adipocyte-Derived DNA Triggers Inflammation

Adipocyte-Derived DNA Triggers Inflammation

By | March 25, 2016

DNA released from dying fat cells stimulates inflammation within murine fat tissue. 

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