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image: Caloric Restriction Turns White Fat Brown

Caloric Restriction Turns White Fat Brown

By | August 25, 2016

Limiting food intake leads to the conversion of white fat cells into more metabolically active brown fat cells through an immune response, a mouse study shows.

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image: Extinct River Dolphin Species Discovered

Extinct River Dolphin Species Discovered

By | August 16, 2016

Overlooked for half a century, a skull in the Smithsonian collection points to a dolphin species that lived 25 million years ago, according to a study.

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image: Using RNA to Amplify RNA

Using RNA to Amplify RNA

By | August 15, 2016

Researchers apply in vitro evolution to generate an RNA enzyme capable of copying and amplifying RNA.

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image: Neural Circuit Plays Role in Overeating

Neural Circuit Plays Role in Overeating

By | August 8, 2016

Activating serotonin receptors halts a binge-like eating behavior in mice, researchers report.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | August 1, 2016

Idiot Brain, Wild Sex, Why Diets Make Us Fat, and The Ethics of Invention

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image: Nailing Down HAR Function

Nailing Down HAR Function

By | August 1, 2016

A remaining challenge in the study of human accelerated regions (HARs) is establishing their specific functions during development and other biological processes.

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image: On Becoming Human

On Becoming Human

By | August 1, 2016

Some thoughts on going to the Galápagos

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image: Opinion: Monogamy and Cooperation Are Connected Through Multiple Links

Opinion: Monogamy and Cooperation Are Connected Through Multiple Links

By and | August 1, 2016

Why does cooperation evolve most often in monogamous animals?

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image: Opinion: Our Inner Caveman

Opinion: Our Inner Caveman

By | August 1, 2016

The modern human brain evolved in social and environmental settings very unlike today’s. Despite our cultural and technological progress, tribal instincts remain.

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A chloroplast mutation has dramatically affected the genomes of railside populations of Arabidopsis thaliana.

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