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image: Black Widow Secrets in Phage Genome

Black Widow Secrets in Phage Genome

By | October 12, 2016

In the DNA of the WO phage, which infects arthropod-inhabiting Wolbachia, researchers find sequences related to a black widow spider’s toxin and other animal genes.

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Ambry Genetics CEO Aaron Elliott discusses his team’s recent analysis of 20,000 clinical next-generation sequencing panels.

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image: Influential Alzheimer’s Researcher Dies

Influential Alzheimer’s Researcher Dies

By | October 6, 2016

Allen Roses, a professor of neurobiology at Duke University School of Medicine, has passed away at age 73.

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Attorneys representing pathologist Fazlul Sarkar and users of the post-publication peer review website present their cases regarding the constitutionality of subpoenaing for the identities of anonymous commenters.

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In an attempt to avoid future subpoenas requesting potentially identifying information on unregistered users of the post-publication peer review website, the platform’s administrators have attempted to cease IP address collection.

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image: Ciliates Are Genetic-Code Deviants

Ciliates Are Genetic-Code Deviants

By | October 1, 2016

Traditional stop codons have a double meaning in the protozoans' mRNA, sometimes calling for an amino acid during translation.

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image: Curious George

Curious George

By | October 1, 2016

George Church has consistently positioned himself at genomics’ leading edge.

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image: Protozoans Found With No Dedicated Stop Codons

Protozoans Found With No Dedicated Stop Codons

By | October 1, 2016

Some ciliates use the same trio of nucleotides to code for an amino acid and to stop translation.

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image: Science History: The First Transgenic <em>Arabidopsis</em>

Science History: The First Transgenic Arabidopsis

By | October 1, 2016

Tweaks to a transformation protocol in 1986 cemented the little plant's mighty role in plant genetics research.

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image: Some Human Cancers Exhibit Low-grade Inflammation

Some Human Cancers Exhibit Low-grade Inflammation

By | October 1, 2016

NSAIDs reduce this "parainflammation," hinting at how they help lower cancer risk.

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