The Scientist

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image: A Nose for Touch

A Nose for Touch

By | September 1, 2012

The remarkable ability of the star-nosed mole to interpret its surroundings through touch is yielding clues about mammalian sensory processing in general.

2 Comments

image: A Story Biological

A Story Biological

By | September 1, 2012

Using scientific information as narrative can be a powerful way to communicate.

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image: Gifted in Science

Gifted in Science

By | September 1, 2012

Researchers look to the emerging phenomenon of "crowdfunding" to pay for their work

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image: Good Vibrations

Good Vibrations

By | September 1, 2012

Researchers are learning how species from across the animal kingdom use seismic signals to mate, hunt, solve territorial disputes, and much more.

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image: Missing Touch

Missing Touch

By | September 1, 2012

Bionic fingers. Rewired nerves. Science fiction becomes reality as scientists attempt to give prosthetics a sense of touch.

2 Comments

image: Pleasant to the Touch

Pleasant to the Touch

By | September 1, 2012

Scientists hope an understanding of nerve fibers responsive only to gentle touch will give insight into the role the sense plays in social bonding.

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image: Robo Touch

Robo Touch

By | September 1, 2012

Because of a lack of touch, upper-limb prosthetic users must look at their prosthetic hands the whole time they use them. Unfortunately, the prosthetics research community has put most of its efforts into making arms with wider ranges of motion and m

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image: Glass Shape Speeds Drinking

Glass Shape Speeds Drinking

By | August 31, 2012

The shape of the glass holding your favorite brew can affect how quickly you get drunk.

31 Comments

image: Stalking Sharks

Stalking Sharks

By | August 30, 2012

Researchers monitor the movement of the Pacific’s largest predators and share the information with the world in real time.

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image: Curiouser and Curiouser

Curiouser and Curiouser

By | August 23, 2012

A review of the new book Curious Behavior, which delves into the quirks of human conduct.

7 Comments

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