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image: Mixed Report for Oiled Salt Marshes

Mixed Report for Oiled Salt Marshes

By | June 25, 2012

Louisiana’s salt marshes are recovering from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, but some areas have been irreversibly lost.

3 Comments

image: NIH Tackles Racism

NIH Tackles Racism

By | June 25, 2012

An advisory committee urges the federal funding agency to take steps to counter racial bias in the granting process.

2 Comments

image: The Gigapixel Camera

The Gigapixel Camera

By | June 22, 2012

A single camera unit can capture a moment in time at a mind-boggling resolution.

1 Comment

image: “Extinct” Toad Rediscovered

“Extinct” Toad Rediscovered

By | June 21, 2012

A yellow-bellied dwarf toad, last sighted in 1876, is rediscovered in Sri Lanka.

0 Comments

image: UK Gov’t Supports Open Access Plan

UK Gov’t Supports Open Access Plan

By | June 19, 2012

The UK government releases its recommendation that open access be “the main vehicle for the publication of research,” though it warns of the costs that could entail.

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image: West Coast Marine Threat

West Coast Marine Threat

By | June 18, 2012

Rising ocean acidity along the California coast may wreak havoc in the region’s oyster populations.

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image: The Ecology of Fear

The Ecology of Fear

By | June 15, 2012

Grasshoppers in fear of predation die with less nitrogen in their bodies than unstressed grasshoppers, which can affect soil ecology.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: What’s Wrong with COI?

Opinion: What’s Wrong with COI?

By | June 12, 2012

Financial “conflicts of interest” should not be so quickly condemned. Industry relationships are unequivocally beneficial.

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image: A Greener Arctic

A Greener Arctic

By | June 11, 2012

Algal blooms are appearing under the ice in the Arctic Ocean in areas thought to receive too little light to support photosynthetic life.

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image: Discovering Phasmids

Discovering Phasmids

By | June 9, 2012

Shortly after a rat infested supply ship ran around in Lord Howe Island off the east coast of Australia in 1918, the newly introduced mammals wiped out the island's phasmids—stick insects the size of a human hand. 

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