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image: Artificial Touch Enabled

Artificial Touch Enabled

By | October 13, 2016

A quadriplegic 28-year-old man senses touch via stimulation of electrodes implanted in his somatosensory cortex.

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image: Altered Sense of Touch in Autism?

Altered Sense of Touch in Autism?

By | June 10, 2016

A mouse study suggests that disruptions to nerves in the skin may contribute to autism spectrum disorder.

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image: Mapping the Emotional Body

Mapping the Emotional Body

By | November 17, 2014

Researchers studying neurons that respond to gentle touch reveal that people find strokes on another person's back and shoulder more pleasurable than strokes to the forearm and hand.

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image: Placebo’s Double Whammy

Placebo’s Double Whammy

By | October 14, 2013

Sham treatments can both reduce pain and increase pleasure, and do so affecting similar circuitry in the brain.

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image: Why Mice Like Massages

Why Mice Like Massages

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers pinpoint a gene marker for neurons sensitive to gentle touch such as grooming.

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image: Sense and Sensibility

Sense and Sensibility

By | September 1, 2012

Why is tactile perception so fundamental to life?

3 Comments

image: Pleasant to the Touch

Pleasant to the Touch

By | September 1, 2012

Scientists hope an understanding of nerve fibers responsive only to gentle touch will give insight into the role the sense plays in social bonding.

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