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» prosthetics and microbiology

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image: FDA Approves Prosthetic Arm

FDA Approves Prosthetic Arm

By | May 14, 2014

The agency OKs the first prosthetic arm controlled by neural signals from the user’s muscles.

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image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

By | April 24, 2014

A marine cyanobacterium possesses astounding genomic diversity, yet still organizes into distinct subpopulations that have likely persisted for ages.

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image: Money Microbiome

Money Microbiome

By | April 24, 2014

Swabbing cash circulating in New York City reveals more than 3,000 different types of bacteria.

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image: Cochlear Implant Gene Therapy

Cochlear Implant Gene Therapy

By | April 23, 2014

The surgically implanted device can be tweaked to provide short electric bursts that send a nerve-growing gene into local cells, a study on guinea pigs shows.

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image: Microbiome Influences

Microbiome Influences

By | April 22, 2014

Researchers find that gender, education level, and breastfeeding can affect humans’ commensal microbial communities.

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image: DARPA Puts Biotech at the Fore

DARPA Puts Biotech at the Fore

By | April 4, 2014

The U.S. Department of Defense is solidifying its focus on the life sciences with a new division of biotechnology.  

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image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.

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image: Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

By | March 19, 2014

Commensal bacteria that populate the human gastrointestinal tract help digest dark chocolate, releasing anti-inflammatory compounds, researchers report.

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