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» prosthetics and developmental biology

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

2 Comments

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Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

1 Comment

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Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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Thoughts Control Robotic Hand

By | December 17, 2012

Researchers develop a mind-controlled, prosthetic hand for a quadriplegic patient.

1 Comment

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2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Self-Healing Electronic Skin

Self-Healing Electronic Skin

By | November 14, 2012

A new type of pressure-sensitive self-healing plastic could be used as synthetic skin to allow people with prosthetic limbs to feel.

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image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

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