The Scientist

» prosthetics and developmental biology

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image: Prosthetics Pioneer Dies

Prosthetics Pioneer Dies

By | June 3, 2014

Melvin Glimcher, inventor of the prosthetic “Boston Arm,” which moves in response to electrical signals from the wearer, has passed away at age 88.


image: FDA Approves Prosthetic Arm

FDA Approves Prosthetic Arm

By | May 14, 2014

The agency OKs the first prosthetic arm controlled by neural signals from the user’s muscles.


image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.


image: Cochlear Implant Gene Therapy

Cochlear Implant Gene Therapy

By | April 23, 2014

The surgically implanted device can be tweaked to provide short electric bursts that send a nerve-growing gene into local cells, a study on guinea pigs shows.


image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

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image: DARPA Puts Biotech at the Fore

DARPA Puts Biotech at the Fore

By | April 4, 2014

The U.S. Department of Defense is solidifying its focus on the life sciences with a new division of biotechnology.  


image: Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

By | April 2, 2014

Researchers complete an atlas depicting gene expression across the developing human brain.

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image: Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

By | March 26, 2014

New research suggests that the wooly beasts may have succumbed to a shrinking gene pool or intense environmental pressures as their species went extinct.

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image: <em>BRCA1</em> Linked to Brain Size

BRCA1 Linked to Brain Size

By | March 20, 2014

The breast cancer-associated gene may play a protective role in neural stem cells, a mouse study finds.


image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.


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