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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2012

Wired for Story, Dreamland, Homo Mysterious, and Vagina


image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2012

September 2012's selection of notable quotes

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image: A Story Biological

A Story Biological

By | September 1, 2012

Using scientific information as narrative can be a powerful way to communicate.


image: Gifted in Science

Gifted in Science

By | September 1, 2012

Researchers look to the emerging phenomenon of "crowdfunding" to pay for their work

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image: Missing Touch

Missing Touch

By | September 1, 2012

Bionic fingers. Rewired nerves. Science fiction becomes reality as scientists attempt to give prosthetics a sense of touch.


image: Robo Touch

Robo Touch

By | September 1, 2012

Because of a lack of touch, upper-limb prosthetic users must look at their prosthetic hands the whole time they use them. Unfortunately, the prosthetics research community has put most of its efforts into making arms with wider ranges of motion and m


image: Glass Shape Speeds Drinking

Glass Shape Speeds Drinking

By | August 31, 2012

The shape of the glass holding your favorite brew can affect how quickly you get drunk.


image: Stalking Sharks

Stalking Sharks

By | August 30, 2012

Researchers monitor the movement of the Pacific’s largest predators and share the information with the world in real time.


image: Curiouser and Curiouser

Curiouser and Curiouser

By | August 23, 2012

A review of the new book Curious Behavior, which delves into the quirks of human conduct.


image: Do That Again

Do That Again

By | August 15, 2012

A new initiative offers gold stars to researchers willing to have their studies replicated by other labs, but will it fix science’s growing irreproducibility problem?


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