The Scientist

» paleontology and immunology

Most Recent

image: Ancient Sex

Ancient Sex

By | October 19, 2014

Fossils of an extinct, armored fish challenge current understanding of when copulation and internal fertilization evolved in jawed vertebrates.

3 Comments

image: Dinos on Special Diets

Dinos on Special Diets

By | October 9, 2014

Skull structures suggest that sauropod dinosaur species subsisted on different plant types.

0 Comments

image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

2 Comments

image: Prehistoric Critters Change View of Mammal Evolution

Prehistoric Critters Change View of Mammal Evolution

By | September 12, 2014

Three extinct squirrel-like species were identified from Jurassic-era fossils in China.

1 Comment

image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse, July 18

The Scientist on The Pulse, July 18

By | July 18, 2014

Flying dinos, genetic pacemakers, and dangerous microbes on the loose

0 Comments

image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

1 Comment

image: A Rock and a Hard Place

A Rock and a Hard Place

By | July 1, 2014

Meet the retired chemical engineer who has made quite the impression on paleoentomology by uncovering ancient secrets of insect coitus.

0 Comments

image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

1 Comment

image: Ancient Fish Analyzed

Ancient Fish Analyzed

By | June 13, 2014

Two paleontological findings yield insights into early vertebrate evolution.

0 Comments

image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

0 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Making Progress by Slowing Down
  2. A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865
    Foundations A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

    This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.

  3. Influential Cancer Biologist Dies
  4. Image of the Day: Colorful Corn
Advertisement
Advertisement
Life Technologies