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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

By | February 15, 2017

Researchers have described a pregnant Dinochephalosaurus, and the fossilized remains suggest that the massive animal did not lay eggs, as previously suspected.

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

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image: Image of the Day: Creepy Crawlers

Image of the Day: Creepy Crawlers

By | January 30, 2017

Scientists discover the alien-like Aethiocarenus burmanicus, a 100 million-year old insect with a triangular head and bulging eyes.

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image: Image of the Day: Giant Otters

Image of the Day: Giant Otters

By | January 24, 2017

Paleontologists uncover a nearly complete cranium of Siamogale melilutra, a 6.24 million-year-old otter species that was as large as some modern wolf species.

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image: Long Egg Incubations May Have Doomed the Dinosaurs

Long Egg Incubations May Have Doomed the Dinosaurs

By | January 5, 2017

An investigation of fossilized teeth reveals that some dinosaurs took more than six months to hatch, hindering their abilities to procreate quickly and efficiently.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Testosterone Rex</em>

Book Excerpt from Testosterone Rex

By | January 1, 2017

In Chapter 6, “The Hormonal Essence of the T-Rex?” author Cordelia Fine considers the biological dogma that testes, and the powerful hormones they exude, are the root of all sexual inequality.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | January 1, 2017

Science under Trump, gene drive, medical marijuana, and more

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image: Study: Dinosaurs Lost Teeth, Grew Bird-Like Beaks

Study: Dinosaurs Lost Teeth, Grew Bird-Like Beaks

By | December 28, 2016

Fossil analysis suggests members of at least one dinosaur species started out with full sets of teeth, only to lose them in adulthood and develop beaks instead.

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image: Speaking of Science: 2016

Speaking of Science: 2016

By | December 19, 2016

Selected quotes from an eventful year

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