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“Buena vista” hypothesis suggests that changes in the sizes of eyes, rather than a shift from fins to limbs, led fish to transition to land more than 300 million years ago.  

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Researchers find what appear to be 3.77 billion-year-old hints of microbial life hidden in Canadian rocks, but some scientists are not convinced.

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Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

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image: Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

By | February 17, 2017

A computer algorithm can identify the brains of autism patients with moderate accuracy based on scans taken at six months and one year of age.

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image: Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

By | February 15, 2017

Researchers have described a pregnant Dinochephalosaurus, and the fossilized remains suggest that the massive animal did not lay eggs, as previously suspected.

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The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center researcher links complex traits to the genes that underlie them.

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image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

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image: Science Your Plants!

Science Your Plants!

By | February 1, 2017

CalTech researcher Elliot Meyerowitz describes how plant genetics influences growth and productivity.

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image: Image of the Day: Creepy Crawlers

Image of the Day: Creepy Crawlers

By | January 30, 2017

Scientists discover the alien-like Aethiocarenus burmanicus, a 100 million-year old insect with a triangular head and bulging eyes.

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image: Image of the Day: Giant Otters

Image of the Day: Giant Otters

By | January 24, 2017

Paleontologists uncover a nearly complete cranium of Siamogale melilutra, a 6.24 million-year-old otter species that was as large as some modern wolf species.

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