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Researchers find the oldest and largest crocodile relative yet discovered.

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image: Oldest <em>Homo</em> Remains Yet Found

Oldest Homo Remains Yet Found

By | March 4, 2015

A newly discovered 2.8 million-year-old jawbone is thought to be that of a direct human ancestor.

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image: Two New Jurassic Mammals Found

Two New Jurassic Mammals Found

By | February 13, 2015

Researchers working in China have unearthed the fossil remains of two diminutive mammals that speak volumes about faunal diversity during the Jurassic Period.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

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image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Walking Whales</em>

Book Excerpt from The Walking Whales

By | November 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “Fossils and War,” author J.G.M. “Hans” Thewissen describes the difficulties of conducting field research in a conflict zone.

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image: Walking with Whales

Walking with Whales

By | November 1, 2014

The history of cetaceans can serve as a model for both evolutionary dynamics and interdisciplinary collaboration.

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image: Ancient Sex

Ancient Sex

By | October 19, 2014

Fossils of an extinct, armored fish challenge current understanding of when copulation and internal fertilization evolved in jawed vertebrates.

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