The Scientist

» paleontology and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Reimagining Humanity

Reimagining Humanity

By | June 1, 2015

As the science of paleoanthropology developed, human evolutionary trees changed as much as the minds that constructed them.

0 Comments

image: What’s Old Is New Again

What’s Old Is New Again

By | June 1, 2015

Revolutionary new methods for extracting, purifying, and sequencing ever-more-ancient DNA have opened an unprecedented window into the history of life on Earth.

2 Comments

image: A New Human Ancestor?

A New Human Ancestor?

By | May 28, 2015

Researchers in Ethiopia unearth a previously unknown species of hominin, which roamed Africa at the same time as “Lucy.”

0 Comments

image: Oldest Stone Tools Discovered

Oldest Stone Tools Discovered

By | May 26, 2015

Researchers unearth 3.3 million-year-old stone flakes in Kenya, forcing a reimagining of the emergence of such technologies in the ancestors of humans.

0 Comments

image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

0 Comments

image: The Rise of Heads

The Rise of Heads

By | May 11, 2015

A 500 million-year-old brain fossil yields clues to the evolution of heads.

0 Comments

image: Winged Dino Found?

Winged Dino Found?

By | May 1, 2015

Researchers describe a small species that may have soared through Jurassic skies on membranous wings like those of bats and flying squirrels.

0 Comments

image: <em>T. rex</em>’s Vegetarian Cousin

T. rex’s Vegetarian Cousin

By | April 28, 2015

Researchers discover a considerably less ferocious branch of the family tree that includes one of the most fearsome dinosaurs to ever walk the Earth.

1 Comment

image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

1 Comment

image: Study: Acidic Oceans Behind Extinctions

Study: Acidic Oceans Behind Extinctions

By | April 13, 2015

Massive die-offs of just about every marine species millions of years ago are thought to have resulted from a surge of carbon dioxide.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Neurons Compete to Form Memories
  2. Mapping the Human Connectome
    Daily News Mapping the Human Connectome

    A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

  3. The Genetic Components of Rare Diseases
  4. Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised
RayBiotech