The Scientist

» paleontology and disease/medicine

Most Recent

image: Drugging the Disorderome

Drugging the Disorderome

By | October 1, 2017

Strategies for targeting intrinsically disordered proteins

0 Comments

image: Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

By | October 1, 2017

Emerging infections provide clues about how pathogens might evolve when farm animals are protected from infection.

1 Comment

image: Infographic: Evolving Virulence

Infographic: Evolving Virulence

By | October 1, 2017

Tracking the myxoma virus in the wild rabbit populations of Australia has yielded insight into how pathogens and their hosts evolve.

1 Comment

Researchers use base-editing to swap out an erroneous nucleotide responsible for a potentially life-threatening blood disorder.

0 Comments

image: Enormous University Gift Raises Questions over Donor Influence

Enormous University Gift Raises Questions over Donor Influence

By | September 26, 2017

The donation to the University of California, Irvine, is slated to fund a new college focusing on what some critics call pseudoscience and quackery.

9 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Fossil Guts

Image of the Day: Fossil Guts

By | September 25, 2017

Scientists unearthed an intact, fossilized digestive organ of a 500-million-year-old trilobite—a prehistoric relative of the horseshoe crab.

0 Comments

image: Mongolian Dinosaurs and the Poaching Problem

Mongolian Dinosaurs and the Poaching Problem

By | September 8, 2017

High-profile cases of poached fossils shine a light on the black market for paleontological specimens—and how scientists and governments are trying to stop it.

1 Comment

image: How Exercise Might Fight Cancer

How Exercise Might Fight Cancer

By | September 8, 2017

Epinephrine’s activation of the signaling pathway Hippo is responsible for the in vitro tumor-fighting effects of serum from women who worked out.

0 Comments

image: Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

By | September 6, 2017

Sweet taste receptor-activating molecules produced by sinus microbes suppress the local innate immune system in humans.

1 Comment

image: Bubbles for Broken Bones

Bubbles for Broken Bones

By | September 1, 2017

Ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles enable gene delivery to fix fractures.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. GM Mosquitoes Closer to Release in U.S.
  2. Judge Recommends Ruling to Block Internet Access to Sci-Hub
  3. Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math
  4. Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?
RayBiotech