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image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Real Planet of the Apes</em>

Book Excerpt from The Real Planet of the Apes

By | December 1, 2015

In Chapter 7, “West Side Story: The African Apes of Europe,” author David Begun describes the thrill of excavating ancient European primates.

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image: Jungle Field Trip

Jungle Field Trip

By | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.

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image: Out of Europe?

Out of Europe?

By | December 1, 2015

Instead of getting its start in Africa, humanity may have had more Continental roots. 

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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

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image: Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

By | November 16, 2015

Mammals diversified 30 million years later than previously estimated, according to a new analysis of an ancient fossil.

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image: A Tiny Missing Link?

A Tiny Missing Link?

By | November 2, 2015

The common ancestor of all apes, including great apes and humans, may have been not-so-great in stature.

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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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image: Taking a Dino’s Temperature

Taking a Dino’s Temperature

By | October 15, 2015

Researchers develop a method for estimating the body temperatures of long-extinct species, and suggest that dinosaurs operated somewhere between endothermy and exothermy.

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