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» olfaction and developmental biology

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image: Sniffing out Alzheimer’s

Sniffing out Alzheimer’s

By | October 9, 2013

A peanut-butter smell test could help diagnose the neurodegenerative disease in its early stages.

1 Comment

image: Pheromone for the Young

Pheromone for the Young

By | October 2, 2013

Researchers identify a compound in juvenile mice that inhibits the sexual advances of adult males.

3 Comments

image: An Olfaction Odyssey

An Olfaction Odyssey

By | October 1, 2013

Thanks to a book, a war, and a big green caterpillar, John Hildebrand found himself mapping the exquisite and surprising wiring of the insect olfactory system.

2 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2013 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Get a Whiff of This

Get a Whiff of This

By | October 1, 2013

An issue devoted to the latest research on how smells lead to actions

2 Comments

image: Scents in a Flash

Scents in a Flash

By | October 1, 2013

The modern technique of optogenetics stimulates the complex act of smelling with a simple flash of light.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | October 1, 2013

October 2013's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: Yoav Gilad: Gene Regulator

Yoav Gilad: Gene Regulator

By | October 1, 2013

Professor, Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago. Age: 38

3 Comments

image: A Pheromone by Any Other Name

A Pheromone by Any Other Name

By | October 1, 2013

Long known to play a role in sexual attraction, pheromones are revealing their influence over a range of nonsexual behaviors as researchers tease apart the neural circuitry that translates smells into action.

2 Comments

image: Smell and the Degenerating Brain

Smell and the Degenerating Brain

By | October 1, 2013

An impaired sense of smell is one of the earliest symptoms of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and some other neurodegenerative diseases. Could it be a useful diagnostic tool?

7 Comments

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