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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Sniff While You Sleep

Sniff While You Sleep

By | November 14, 2014

Smokers light up less after smelling cigarette smoke together with foul odors during sleep, a study shows.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Rise, Mickey

Rise, Mickey

By | November 1, 2014

Scientist to Watch, Takaki Komiyama, discusses his use of chronic two-photon calcium imaging to explore how wakefulness and experience shape odor representations in the mouse olfactory bulb.

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image: Takaki Komiyama: Circuit Seeker

Takaki Komiyama: Circuit Seeker

By | November 1, 2014

Assistant Professor, Neurobiology Section, University of California, San Diego. Age: 35

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Misconduct Ruling for Old Retractions

Misconduct Ruling for Old Retractions

By | July 31, 2014

Zhihua Zou, formerly of Nobel Laureate Linda Buck’s lab, engaged in research misconduct that resulted in the retraction of two highly cited papers.

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image: Super Sniffers?

Super Sniffers?

By | July 24, 2014

African elephants have more genes for olfactory receptors than dogs or humans, a study shows. 

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