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The Scientist

» olfaction and developmental biology

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Get a Whiff of This

Get a Whiff of This

By | October 1, 2013

An issue devoted to the latest research on how smells lead to actions

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image: Scents in a Flash

Scents in a Flash

By | October 1, 2013

The modern technique of optogenetics stimulates the complex act of smelling with a simple flash of light.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | October 1, 2013

October 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Yoav Gilad: Gene Regulator

Yoav Gilad: Gene Regulator

By | October 1, 2013

Professor, Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago. Age: 38

3 Comments

image: A Pheromone by Any Other Name

A Pheromone by Any Other Name

By | October 1, 2013

Long known to play a role in sexual attraction, pheromones are revealing their influence over a range of nonsexual behaviors as researchers tease apart the neural circuitry that translates smells into action.

2 Comments

image: Smell and the Degenerating Brain

Smell and the Degenerating Brain

By | October 1, 2013

An impaired sense of smell is one of the earliest symptoms of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and some other neurodegenerative diseases. Could it be a useful diagnostic tool?

7 Comments

image: Overcoming Fears While Napping

Overcoming Fears While Napping

By | September 22, 2013

Repeated exposure to fear-associated stimuli during short bouts of sleep made study participants less frightened of related provocations once they awoke.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

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