Advertisement

The Scientist

» olfaction and ecology

Most Recent

image: Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

By | November 19, 2014

Researchers discover a densovirus that is strongly associated with sea star wasting disease.

0 Comments

image: Hairy Situation for Wolves

Hairy Situation for Wolves

By | November 16, 2014

Researchers find high stress hormone levels in the hair of hunted wolves in Northern Canada.

0 Comments

image: Sniff While You Sleep

Sniff While You Sleep

By | November 14, 2014

Smokers light up less after smelling cigarette smoke together with foul odors during sleep, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Butterfly Eyespots Deflect Predation

Butterfly Eyespots Deflect Predation

By | November 12, 2014

Researchers show that patterned coloration can be an effective means of distracting predators from vital body parts.

1 Comment

image: Rise, Mickey

Rise, Mickey

By | November 1, 2014

Scientist to Watch, Takaki Komiyama, discusses his use of chronic two-photon calcium imaging to explore how wakefulness and experience shape odor representations in the mouse olfactory bulb.

0 Comments

image: Takaki Komiyama: Circuit Seeker

Takaki Komiyama: Circuit Seeker

By | November 1, 2014

Assistant Professor, Neurobiology Section, University of California, San Diego. Age: 35

0 Comments

image: Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

By | October 20, 2014

Several toad, newt, and salamander populations are being hit hard by an emerging pathogen in a pristine national park in Spain.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

1 Comment

image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

0 Comments

image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

2 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement
Life Technologies