Advertisement
PerkinElmer
PerkinElmer

The Scientist

» top 10 innovations 2012 and culture

Most Recent

image: Trading Pelts for Pestilence

Trading Pelts for Pestilence

By | July 1, 2011

When European explorers and fishermen began to frequent Canada’s shores in the 16th century, they brought with them a plethora of tools and trinkets, including knives, axes, kettles, and blankets. 

6 Comments

image: Last Day for Salary Survey

Last Day for Salary Survey

By | June 26, 2011

Today is your last chance to participate in our 2011 survey of life science salaries.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | June 24, 2011

June 2011's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: Darwin Goes Digital

Darwin Goes Digital

By | June 24, 2011

Much of Charles Darwin’s personal library–both his books and what he wrote within them--is now available online.

6 Comments

image: Head trauma in the funny pages

Head trauma in the funny pages

By | June 17, 2011

Researchers are using real-world methods to study traumatic brain injuries in a comic book.

0 Comments

image: 2011 World Science Festival: A look back

2011 World Science Festival: A look back

By | June 10, 2011

The Scientist covered some of the events that made this year's festival memorable.

0 Comments

image: Primal Fashion

Primal Fashion

By | June 9, 2011

Two sisters—Kate, a developmental biologist, and Helen, a high-end fashion designer—team up to develop a couture collection inspired by the first 1,000 hours of embryonic life. 

0 Comments

image: Hard and Harder

Hard and Harder

By | June 5, 2011

The path to eradicating malaria in Africa involves much more than just a vaccine.

18 Comments

In Chapter 9, "We Were Hunted, Which is Why All of Us are Afraid Some of the Time and Some of Us are Afraid All of the Time," author Rob Dunn explains how predators shaped our evolution as we cowered and ran from their ravenous maws.

0 Comments

image: One-Man NIH, 1887

One-Man NIH, 1887

By | June 4, 2011

As epidemics swept across the United States in the 19th century, the US government recognized the pressing need for a national lab dedicated to the study of infectious disease. 

27 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Too Many Mitochondrial Genome Papers
  2. Antibiotics and the Gut Microbiome
  3. Sex Differences in Pain Pathway
  4. The Sum of Our Parts
    Features The Sum of Our Parts

    Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

Advertisement
Eppendorf
Eppendorf
Advertisement
The Scientist