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image: Marlboro Chicks

Marlboro Chicks

By | December 5, 2012

Two species of songbirds pack their nests with scavenged cigarette butts that repel irksome parasites.

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image: 2012 Top 10 Innovations - Honorable Mentions

2012 Top 10 Innovations - Honorable Mentions

By | December 4, 2012

These new products didn't quite breech the top 10 this year, but attracted the attention of our panel of expert judges nonetheless.

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Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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Top 10 Innovations 2012

By | December 1, 2012

The Scientist’s 5th installment of its annual competition attracted submissions from across the life science spectrum. Here are the best and brightest products of the year.

5 Comments

image: Coughing Seashells

Coughing Seashells

By | November 28, 2012

A type of scallop expels water and waste through a sort of cough that could reveal clues about water quality.

1 Comment

image: Beetles Warm BC Forests

Beetles Warm BC Forests

By | November 27, 2012

Using satellite data, researchers calculate that mountain pine beetle infestations raise summertime temperatures in British Columbia’s pine forests by 1 degree Celsius.

3 Comments

image: Old New Species

Old New Species

By | November 20, 2012

Decades can pass between the discovery of a new animal or plant and its official debut in the scientific literature.

4 Comments

image: No Sex Required

No Sex Required

By | November 19, 2012

An all-female species, distantly related to flatworms, steals all of genetic material it needs to diversify its genome.

2 Comments

image: Little Fish in a Big Pond

Little Fish in a Big Pond

By | November 1, 2012

Continued overfishing of forage fish such as sardines and herring can result in devastating ecological and economic outcomes.

1 Comment

image: Microbial Awakening

Microbial Awakening

By | November 1, 2012

Successive awakening of soil microbes drives a huge pulse of CO2 following the first rain after a dry summer.

1 Comment

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