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image: Losers Fight Back

Losers Fight Back

By | February 1, 2011

Editor's choice in developmental biology

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image: Death or Damage of Dopamine Neurons

Death or Damage of Dopamine Neurons

By | February 1, 2011

The hallmark pathology of Parkinson’s disease is the damage and death of dopamine producing neurons in the brain. 

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image: The Genes of Parkinson’s Disease

The Genes of Parkinson’s Disease

By | February 1, 2011

The minority of Parkinson’s cases now known to have genetic origins are shedding light on the cellular mechanisms of all the rest, bringing researchers closer to a cause—and perhaps a cure.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2011

February 2011's selection of notable quotes

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image: Jaume and the Giant Genome

Jaume and the Giant Genome

By | February 1, 2011

A newly minted PhD finds a 150-billion-base-pair-long DNA molecule in a plant.

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image: Appealing Choice

Appealing Choice

By | January 1, 2011

A book is born from pondering why sexual selection was, for so long, a minor component of evolutionary biology.

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image: Eau de Choice

Eau de Choice

By | January 1, 2011

Evolutionary biologist Jane Hurst at the University of Liverpool has found that male mice have evolved a cunning trick to distinguish themselves within the dating pool: they produce a specific protein that drives female attraction to male scent, and this molecule, called darcin, helps females remember a specific male's odor.

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image: Proteins Adorned

Proteins Adorned

By | January 1, 2011

Cracking the Secrets of Posttranslational Modifications

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image: Mining Bacterial Small Molecules

Mining Bacterial Small Molecules

By | January 1, 2011

As much as rainforests or deep-sea vents, the human gut holds rich stores of microbial chemicals that should be mined for their pharmacological potential.

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image: The Evolution of Volvox

The Evolution of Volvox

By | January 1, 2011

The volvocine algae are a model system for studying the evolution of multicellularity, as the group contains extant species ranging from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to a variety of colonial species and the full-fledged multicellular Volvox varieties.

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