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image: Conserved Chromatin?

Conserved Chromatin?

By | December 10, 2012

Archaea packages DNA around histones in a similar way to eukaryotes, suggesting that fitting a large genome into a small space was not the original role of chromatin.


image: 2012 Top 10 Innovations - Honorable Mentions

2012 Top 10 Innovations - Honorable Mentions

By | December 4, 2012

These new products didn't quite breech the top 10 this year, but attracted the attention of our panel of expert judges nonetheless.


image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2012

December 2012's selection of notable quotes


image: The Plastic Genome

The Plastic Genome

By | December 1, 2012

The poxvirus stockpiles genes when it needs to adapt.

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image: Top 10 Innovations 2012

Top 10 Innovations 2012

By | December 1, 2012

The Scientist’s 5th installment of its annual competition attracted submissions from across the life science spectrum. Here are the best and brightest products of the year.


image: Charles Darwin for Congress

Charles Darwin for Congress

By | November 13, 2012

Nominated as a write-in candidate as a protest against the anti-science incumbent, famed naturalist Charles Darwin won 4,000 congressional votes in a Georgia county.

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image: Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

By | November 1, 2012

In Chapter 2, "Consequences and Evolution: The Cause That Works Backwards," author Susan M. Schneider places evolutionary theory in terms of the science of consequences.

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image: Moss Harbors Foreign Genes

Moss Harbors Foreign Genes

By | October 23, 2012

Genes from fungi, bacteria, and viruses may have helped mosses and other plants to colonize the land.


image: The Salinella salve Mystery

The Salinella salve Mystery

By | October 1, 2012

Salinella salve, an organism described as a single layer of cells, ciliated on both inner and outer surfaces and surrounding…


image: Gone Missing, circa 1892

Gone Missing, circa 1892

By | October 1, 2012

A unique organism sighted only once, more than a century ago, could shed light on the evolution of multicellularity—if it ever actually existed.



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