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image: Sandy’s Impact on Science

Sandy’s Impact on Science

By | November 5, 2012

More stories surface about how last week’s super storm is affecting research up and down the coast—and how science is fighting back.

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image: NYC Science Stunned by Sandy

NYC Science Stunned by Sandy

By | November 2, 2012

Super storm Sandy wreaks havoc on researchers across New York City, destroying samples, killing lab animals, and cutting power to much of Manhattan.

6 Comments

image: Little Fish in a Big Pond

Little Fish in a Big Pond

By | November 1, 2012

Continued overfishing of forage fish such as sardines and herring can result in devastating ecological and economic outcomes.

1 Comment

image: Microbial Awakening

Microbial Awakening

By | November 1, 2012

Successive awakening of soil microbes drives a huge pulse of CO2 following the first rain after a dry summer.

1 Comment

image: The Birthday Conference

The Birthday Conference

By | November 1, 2012

Snapshots from an annual meeting that celebrates the birth of a prominent biologist

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image: A Celebrated Symposium

A Celebrated Symposium

By | November 1, 2012

A conference, started 10 years ago partly as a disease ecologist’s birthday party, has become one of the most valued meetings in the field.  

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image: 3-Year-Old Report Predicted NYC Flooding

3-Year-Old Report Predicted NYC Flooding

By | November 1, 2012

A New York City climate change brain trust warned of severe damage to the city that bears a striking resemblance to the chaos recently wrought by Hurricane Sandy.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Super Storm Sandy

Opinion: Super Storm Sandy

By | October 31, 2012

What role did climate change play in this week’s massive hurricane?

12 Comments

image: Hurricane Sandy Blows Through

Hurricane Sandy Blows Through

By | October 30, 2012

Floods, downed trees, and power outages greet the East Coast this morning.

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image: Opinion: Fishy Deaths

Opinion: Fishy Deaths

By | October 29, 2012

Record fish die-offs in the Midwest call for a fresh look at how humans are disrupting the planet’s essential water cycle.

1 Comment

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