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image: Nervous Mice Get Worse Cancer

Nervous Mice Get Worse Cancer

By | May 3, 2012

Anxious mice are more likely to come down with aggressive skin cancer than those who show less stress on behavioral tests.

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image: FDA Disputes Data Under-Reporting

FDA Disputes Data Under-Reporting

By | May 2, 2012

The FDA and NIH dispute reports that clinical trial data is being under-reported.

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image: Telomere Basics

Telomere Basics

By | May 1, 2012

Telomeres are repetitive, noncoding sequences that cap the ends of linear chromosomes. They consist of hexameric nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG in humans) repeated hundreds to thousands of times. 

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Contributors

May 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Treating Fat with Fat

Treating Fat with Fat

By | May 1, 2012

Is brown fat ready for therapeutic prime time?

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image: Data Diving

Data Diving

By | May 1, 2012

What lies untapped beneath the surface of published clinical trial analyses could rock the world of independent review.

28 Comments

image: Freezing Time

Freezing Time

By | May 1, 2012

Targeting the briefest moment in chemistry may lead to an exceptionally strong new class of drugs.

15 Comments

image: Telomeres in Disease

Telomeres in Disease

By | May 1, 2012

Telomeres have been linked to numerous diseases over the years, but how exactly short telomeres cause diseases and how medicine can prevent telomere erosion are still up for debate.

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image: Mad Cow in California

Mad Cow in California

By | April 30, 2012

A variant of the prion disease that causes bovine spongiform encephalopathy was found in the United States.

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image: Amgen Founder Dies

Amgen Founder Dies

By | April 25, 2012

George Rathmann, father of the biotech industry, passes away.

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