The Scientist

» ENCODE, evolution and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2014

Your Atomic Self, Eureka!, A Talent for Friendship, and Undeniable

0 Comments

image: Microflora for Hire

Microflora for Hire

By | December 1, 2014

The guts of cows and termites harbor microbes that are renowned complex-carbohydrate digesters, but the human gastrointestinal tract has flora that just might measure up.

2 Comments

image: Polymerase Pieces

Polymerase Pieces

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers discover a new subunit of a bacterial RNA polymerase—as well as hints of its potential role in defending against viruses.

0 Comments

image: Mosquito Genomes Galore

Mosquito Genomes Galore

By | November 27, 2014

Whole-genome sequences of 16 different mosquito species reveal rapid evolution and could inform malaria research.

1 Comment

image: Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

By | November 24, 2014

The cold-tolerant cereal crop allowed humans to live and farm higher than ever starting more than 3,000 years ago.

0 Comments

image: Similarities and Differences

Similarities and Differences

By | November 21, 2014

Results from the Mouse ENCODE project point to key divergences in gene regulation architecture compared to humans.

0 Comments

image: Virus Protects Mouse Gut

Virus Protects Mouse Gut

By | November 19, 2014

A murine norovirus appears to recover some of the functions of commensal bacteria in the guts of germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice.

1 Comment

image: Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

By | November 19, 2014

Researchers discover a densovirus that is associated with sea star wasting disease.

0 Comments

image: Species-Specific

Species-Specific

By | November 17, 2014

Scientists uncover striking differences between mouse and human gene expression across a variety of tissues.

10 Comments

image: Sealed With a Kiss

Sealed With a Kiss

By | November 17, 2014

A single intimate smooch can transfer upwards of 80 million bacteria.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  2. RNAi’s Future in Drug-Target Screening
    News Analysis RNAi’s Future in Drug-Target Screening

    A recent CRISPR study contradicted years of RNA interference research on a well-studied cancer drug target. But is it the last nail in the coffin for RNAi as a screening tool? 

  3. A History of Screening for Natural Products to Fight Cancer
  4. Streakers, Poopers, and Performers: The Wilder Side of Wildlife Cameras
AAAS