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image: Infection-Autism Link Explained?

Infection-Autism Link Explained?

By | January 31, 2016

A mouse study suggests a mechanism by which severe infections during pregnancy increase autism risk. 

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image: Schizophrenia and the Synapse

Schizophrenia and the Synapse

By | January 27, 2016

Genetic evidence suggests that overactive synaptic pruning drives development of schizophrenia.

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image: More Evidence of Alzheimer’s Transmission

More Evidence of Alzheimer’s Transmission

By | January 27, 2016

Examining the brains of seven patients who died of the prion disease called Creutzfeldt–Jakob, researchers find signs of Alzheimer’s pathology. 

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image: Lizard Secretes Heat

Lizard Secretes Heat

By | January 25, 2016

Researchers confirm the unprecedented endothermic abilities of a South American reptile.

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image: Processing Faces

Processing Faces

By | January 21, 2016

Other people’s faces are mapped onto our brains.

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image: Cocaine Induces Neuronal Autophagy

Cocaine Induces Neuronal Autophagy

By | January 19, 2016

A new study supports the idea that cocaine triggers brain cells to eat themselves and suggests a possible antidote.

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image: How Blasts Affect the Brain

How Blasts Affect the Brain

By | January 13, 2016

Repeated exposure to explosions can damage the cerebellum in combat veterans and mouse models alike.

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image: How Multicellularity Arose

How Multicellularity Arose

By | January 11, 2016

Researchers identify a molecule that may have been key to the surprisingly common transition from single-celled ancestors to today’s complex, multicellular organisms. 

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | January 8, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Brain-Training Firm, FTC Settle

Brain-Training Firm, FTC Settle

By | January 6, 2016

San Francisco-based Lumos Labs, creator of the brain-training program Lumosity, will pay $2 million to settle deceptive-advertising charges raised by the US Federal Trade Commission.

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