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» ENCODE, evolution and disease/medicine

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Games for Science

By | January 1, 2013

Scientists are using video games to tap the collective intelligence of people around the world, while doctors and educators are turning to games to treat and teach.

7 Comments

image: Genomics-Informed Pathology

Genomics-Informed Pathology

By | January 1, 2013

Twenty-first century lab reports will include test results read by a new breed of pathologist.

1 Comment

image: Sex and the Primordial Ooze

Sex and the Primordial Ooze

By | January 1, 2013

The rise of copulation as a vertebrate reproductive strategy may have driven crucial evolutionary change and explosive species radiation.

2 Comments

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Steal My Sunshine

By | January 1, 2013

How photosynthetic organisms get taken up, passed around, and discarded throughout the eukaryotic domain

6 Comments

image: Evolution by Splicing

Evolution by Splicing

By | December 20, 2012

Comparing gene transcripts from different species reveals surprising splicing diversity.

1 Comment

image: Science and Politics in 2012

Science and Politics in 2012

By | December 19, 2012

This year, US politics was dominated by the run-up to October elections, with science policy issues playing a role here and elsewhere around the world.

1 Comment

image: Maggot Medicine

Maggot Medicine

By | December 10, 2012

The healing powers of maggots may lie in their secreted proteins, which restrain the human immune response.

2 Comments

image: Conserved Chromatin?

Conserved Chromatin?

By | December 10, 2012

Archaea packages DNA around histones in a similar way to eukaryotes, suggesting that fitting a large genome into a small space was not the original role of chromatin.

2 Comments

image: Drug Approvals Up

Drug Approvals Up

By | December 7, 2012

The total number of new drugs approved this year ties last year for the highest since 2004, suggesting that the pharmaceutical industry is recovering.  

0 Comments

image: Hurry Up, FDA

Hurry Up, FDA

By | December 6, 2012

The US Food and Drug Administration is taking steps to get new devices on the market sooner—and antibiotics may be next.

0 Comments

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