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image: Reveling in the Revealed

Reveling in the Revealed

By | January 1, 2016

A growing toolbox for surveying the activity of entire genomes

2 Comments

image: Messages in the Noise

Messages in the Noise

By | August 1, 2015

After spending more than a decade developing tools to study patterns in gene sequences, bioinformaticians are now working on programs to analyze epigenomics data.

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image: Batch Effect Behind Species-Specific Results?

Batch Effect Behind Species-Specific Results?

By | May 19, 2015

Reanalysis of Mouse ENCODE data suggests mouse and human genes are expressed in tissue-specific, rather than species-specific, patterns. 

1 Comment

image: Similarities and Differences

Similarities and Differences

By | November 21, 2014

Results from the Mouse ENCODE project point to key divergences in gene regulation architecture compared to humans.

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image: Species-Specific

Species-Specific

By | November 17, 2014

Scientists uncover striking differences between mouse and human gene expression across a variety of tissues.

10 Comments

image: Expanding ENCODE

Expanding ENCODE

By | August 27, 2014

Latest Encyclopedia of DNA Elements data enable researchers to compare genome regulation across species. 

1 Comment

image: Human Gene Set Shrinks Again

Human Gene Set Shrinks Again

By | July 8, 2014

Proteomic data suggest the human genome may encode fewer than 20,000 genes.

1 Comment

image: A Guide to the Epigenome

A Guide to the Epigenome

By | November 1, 2012

Making sense of the data deluge

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | October 1, 2012

October 2012's selection of notable quotes

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image: Forensic Law Turns to Epigenetics

Forensic Law Turns to Epigenetics

By | September 25, 2012

Privacy advocates are arguing that collecting genetic data upon arrest is an invasion of privacy, given recent evidence that 80 percent of the human genome is functional.

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