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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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image: CRISPR “Kill Switches” for GMOs

CRISPR “Kill Switches” for GMOs

By | May 21, 2015

Researchers create an inducible method to remove specific genes and even kill escaped genetically modified organisms.

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: FDA Deems GM Apples, Potatoes Safe

FDA Deems GM Apples, Potatoes Safe

By | March 23, 2015

Genetically modified, non-browning apples and bruise-resistant potatoes are safe, the US Food and Drug Administration says.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Opinion: On Global GMO Regulation

Opinion: On Global GMO Regulation

By | February 25, 2015

Advances in genome-editing technologies have made modifying crops easier than ever before. They’ve also clouded the already murky realm of genetically modified foods.

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image: USDA Approves Genetically Engineered Apples

USDA Approves Genetically Engineered Apples

By | February 16, 2015

Apples genetically modified to resist browning can be commercially planted in the U.S., the government ruled last week.

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image: GMO “Kill Switches”

GMO “Kill Switches”

By | January 21, 2015

Scientists design bacteria reliant upon synthetic amino acids to contain genetically modified organisms.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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