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The Scientist

» data mining and developmental biology

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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image: Publishing Data

Publishing Data

By | May 29, 2014

Nature’s publisher launches a new peer-reviewed, online-only journal that will accept descriptions of data sets.

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image: Sharing the Wealth

Sharing the Wealth

By | May 1, 2014

From research results to electronic health records, biomedical data are becoming increasingly accessible. How can scientists best capitalize on the information deluge?

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Opinion: Latent Value in the Literature

Opinion: Latent Value in the Literature

By | April 28, 2014

With scientific budgets eroding, the biomedical community needs to get more return from the data it has already generated.

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image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

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image: Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

By | April 2, 2014

Researchers complete an atlas depicting gene expression across the developing human brain.

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image: Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

By | March 26, 2014

New research suggests that the wooly beasts may have succumbed to a shrinking gene pool or intense environmental pressures as their species went extinct.

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