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The Scientist

» data mining and developmental biology

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image: Opinion: Text Mining in the Clinic

Opinion: Text Mining in the Clinic

By | April 1, 2013

Despite increasing use of electronic medical records, much patient data remains in text form, requiring text-mining techniques to make full use of patient information.

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: Disputes Over Text-Mining

Disputes Over Text-Mining

By | March 21, 2013

Computer programs that trawl research papers can reveal important large-scale patterns and facilitate further research, but publishers are wary.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Networking Medicine

Networking Medicine

By | March 2, 2013

Although fully organized patient-run trials are still few and far between, patients are taking a more active role in clinical research.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Do-It-Yourself Medicine

Do-It-Yourself Medicine

By | March 1, 2013

Patients are sidestepping clinical research and using themselves as guinea pigs to test new treatments for fatal diseases. Will they hurt themselves, or science?

9 Comments

image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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